Frequently Asked Questions

What is the Trust Land Office?
What is the Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority?

Who are the beneficiaries of The Trust?
What is the TLO’s stewardship role?
Why does The Trust own land?
How many acres does The Trust own?
Does The Trust own all the rights to its land?
What is the breakdown of land rights/ownership among The Trust’s parcels?
How can I learn what rights The Trust owns for a particular parcel?
Can I buy Trust land? If I buy or lease Trust land, what rights do I acquire?
What does the TLO do with revenue?
Can I hunt and fish on Trust land?


What is the Trust Land Office?
The Trust Land Office (TLO) is a unit attached to the Department of Natural Resources that is specifically responsible for managing the land and other natural resources owned by the Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority (The Trust). The TLO generates revenue by land leases and sales; real estate; timber sales; mineral and energy exploration and development; and material sales.

What is the Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority?
The Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority is a state corporation that administers the Alaska Mental Health Trust, a perpetual trust managed for the benefit of people with mental illness, developmental disabilities, chronic alcoholism and other substance related disorders, Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia, and traumatic brain injury. The Trust operates like a private foundation, using its resources to ensure that Alaska has a comprehensive integrated mental health program.

Who are the beneficiaries of The Trust?
Beneficiaries of The Trust include the following broad groups of Alaskans who experience:

• Mental illness
• Developmental disabilities
• Chronic alcoholism and other substance related disorders • Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia
• Traumatic brain injuries

What is the TLO’s stewardship role?
In addition to revenue generation, the TLO is charged with managing Trust lands prudently, efficiently and with accountability to The Trust and its beneficiaries. The TLO carries out its stewardship role by managing and protecting the inherent value of The Trust’s real property portfolio for today’s development opportunities and into perpetuity. Preservation responsibilities include evaluating and monitoring a long-term asset management strategy, restoration or reclamation projects, conservation easements and trespass/access controls.

Why does The Trust own land?
Prior to statehood, Alaska did not have a mental health system. Individuals with a mental disability, such as a mental illness, Down syndrome, dementia or chronic alcoholism, could be charged as an “insane person at large” and sent by the federal government to a mental hospital in Oregon. In 1956, Congress passed the Alaska Mental Health Enabling Act, entitling the Territory of Alaska to select one million acres of federal land to be used for revenue generation to support mental health services after Alaska became a state.

How many acres does The Trust own?
1,000,000 +/-

Does The Trust own all the rights to its land?
No, in many cases The Trust owns less than all of the land rights.

What is the breakdown of land rights/ownership among The Trust’s parcels?
• Fee simple 55%
• Minerals 11%
• Coal, oil and gas 34%

How can I learn what rights The Trust owns for a particular parcel?
Use our mapper program.

Can I buy Trust land?
The TLO holds two competitive land sales annually. Information about parcels and the bidding process can be found here.

If I buy or lease Trust land, what rights do I acquire?
Surface rights only, with the exception of mineral or energy leases.

What does the TLO do with revenue?
Revenue generated by the TLO is transmitted to the Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority, deposited in the principal fund of the trust or used to acquire additional assets and improve the value of Trust land.

Can I hunt and fish on Trust land?
Although Trust land is managed solely for the benefit of Trust beneficiaries, the TLO has adopted a policy that allows the public to recreate on Trust land when those activities don’t negatively impact the value or long-term productivity of the land. Public Recreational Use Policy.